books i’m bringing on holiday + video

I’m leaving for a holiday to Spain with my family in a few days, and one of the things I have preplanned days, even weeks, before we actually leave is the list of books I’m bringing with me.

We were in Spain in 2015 too and that time I only brought three books, which isn’t a small amount, but for me, it wasn’t enough. All I do on these holidays is spending half of my time in the pool and the rest in the shadow with a book. So I have a lot of time to read books.

Therefore, I have learned from my mistakes, and I’m bringing five books this time. Maybe six, I’m not actually hundred precent sure yet. I’ll show you five books now, because I don’t know if I’m bringing a sixth, and which one might be my sixth book.

A COURT OF THORNS AND ROSES by Sarah J. Maas

My sister bought this for me when she was on a summer trip to England a few weeks ago. I have wanted to read this one for a while, but have been a little hesitant, because this is (as far as my knowledge goes) a retelling of beauty and the beast, and I don’t think I’m a big fan of retellings. I might be though, but I don’t like the idea of it. I’m not sure why, though. But I’m willing to give it a shot. (I should warn you, I might be wrong.) Apparently this book is a little more mature then her Throne of Glass series, so I’m interested too see it.

EMPIRE OF STORMS by Sarah J. Maas

Can you tell I like Sarah J. Maas? Well, if not, I do. Every single time I read one of her books I have just fell in love with the story. I have only read the Throne of glass series, and this is the fifth one in the series. I won’t spoil the series obviously, so I’ll tell you what the first book is about: A female assassin is taken out of captivity and given an opportunity to fight in a tournament and be free. And it goes from there. Even though the books are just getting longer and longer, I fly through them. They are just so darn good!

ALL THE LIGHT WE CANNOT SEE by Anthony Doerr (mine is the norwegian version)

First off, can I just tell you one of my book pet peeves? When the effing stickers doesn’t go off!!! Anyways, this book is a historical fiction set during world war 2. It’s about a blind, french girl and an orphaned, german boy, and how their stories, somehow, intertwines. I have heard this book is amazing. And I have wanted to read this for so long and I have had the english edition for a while, but I wanted to read it in Norwegian, so now I’m excited to read this!

THE BOY WHO TRICKED GESTAPO by Harald Utter (Gutten som lurte Gestapo)

I would be surprised if this book actually exists in english, so I’m sorry about that. But this book is a non fiction book about a norwegian resistance man who was 16 years old when he started a resistance cell with his friends and a teacher. It sounds SO good, and I can’t wait to read this soon.

IMG_1239PARIS by Edward Rutherfurd

I just bought this book. It was on sale and it sounded very interesting. It follows seven families over the period of seven hundred years! Just that sounds so… I don’t know. All I know is that I couldn’t leave the store without this one, so it’s going with me to Spain! It’s a long one, so I’m hoping I’ll be able to read the entire thing!

My problem now is to chose which one I want to read first…..

Have you read any of these books? What books are you reading this summer?

Thank you for reading! xx

edit: I have missed filming book videos on youtube so I decided to film one yesterday, and I posted it today. I would love if you would go and watch it :D

book haul

I’m finally feeling a lot better after being sick for a few days, and I am back to blogging. Me being sick had it’s positives though; I managed to read 2,5 books (still working on the third). I’m currently participating in a readathon. This is my first one, and I’m very happy with my progress so far. I will be doing a blog post about it when I’m done! (Saturday/Sunday)

I have been trying to not buy too many books lately because I already have a long tbr (to be read) list, but lately I have been wanting to read more books in Norwegian (as I have been reading mostly English the last few years), so I have had to buy some more.

IMG_0965A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J. Maas. I just said that I bought some more books because I wanted books in Norwegian, but here I am, with an English book. But I actually got this from my sister from when she was in England for a trip with her friends. I really enjoy the Throne of Glass series by the same author, and have heard great things about this series too, so I have wanted to give this a go for a long time.

As far as I know this is a retelling of Beauty and the Beast. I’m usually not a big fan of retelling (though, I have to be honest: I haven’t read many) so I’m excited to see what I think about this book. IMG_0967This book is in Norwegian, though not originally. This is All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr. I actually already have this in English, but as I said I wanted more books in Norwegian, and I have wanted to read this book so much, but every time I sat down to read it, I just couldn’t. I hope I’ll manage to read it in Norwegian! Plus, it was on sale, so I couldn’t go without it!

All the light we cannot see is a world war two fiction about a blind girl and another boy, and their stories links up somehow. I can’t wait to read it. Apparently it’s beautiful. It even won some sort of price!IMG_0964The last book is only in Norwegian. You might have noticed if you read my blog that I’m interested in World War 2. I love reading fiction and non fiction about the war. All though it’s very sad, and I tend to cry a lot. This book is a non fiction book about a 16 year old Norwegian boy who started his own resistance cell with some friends and his teacher. It just sounded very interesting, and I’m actually in the “process” of writing my own story set in world war 2. (I would like to say book, but it’s far from being an actual book.) So reading world war 2 books is both research and fun!

Oh, this book is called Gutten som lurte Gestapo, or translated with the help of google translate: The boy who tricked Gestapo. (I actually had to add this book into goodreads myself because it wasn’t there!)

I’m going to Spain with my family soon, and I’m bringing these three books with me. Last time I went to Spain (same place) I only brought three books and finished them quickly so because I learned from my mistake, I’m bringing five, maybe six, this time!

Thank you for reading. Have you read any of these books? Do you have any other suggestions for books I could read? :)

my 3 favourite world war 2 books

*No spoilers!

I literally wrote this blog post three weeks ago, but since then I have read another one (that is actually set in world war 2) and I decided that I had to redo it. The last two months I have been in the mood to read anything world war two related, and I have actually read almost three books. Two of them are non-fiction, but they are amazing.

But in this post I will show you my three favourite fictional books set during the war:

1. The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah

“Despite their differences, sisters Vianne and Isabelle have always been close. Younger, bolder Isabelle lives in Paris while Vianne is content with life in the French countryside with her husband Antoine and their daughter. But when the Second World War strikes, Antoine is sent off to fight and Vianne finds herself isolated so Isabelle is sent by their father to help her. 

As the war progresses, the sisters’ relationship and strength are tested. With life changing in unbelievably horrific ways, Vianne and Isabelle will find themselves facing frightening situations and responding in ways they never thought possible as bravery and resistance take different forms in each of their actions.”

IMG_0780(I’m sorry about the half finished wall!!!!!)

I absolutely love this book. It’s so well written and is heartbreaking. It is character driven but it was amazing. I loved seeing the relationship between the sisters during the hard few years. It was interesting and in the end of the book I felt like my heart was ripped apart.

I gave this a 5/5 stars on goodreads!

2. Between Shades of Gray by Ruta Sepetys

“Lina is just like any other fifteen-year-old Lithuanian girl in 1941. She paints, she draws, she gets crushes on boys. Until one night when Soviet officers barge into her home, tearing her family from the comfortable life they’ve known. Separated from her father, forced onto a crowded and dirty train car, Lina, her mother, and her young brother slowly make their way north, crossing the Arctic Circle, to a work camp in the coldest reaches of Siberia. Here they are forced, under Stalin’s orders, to dig for beets and fight for their lives under the cruelest of conditions.

Lina finds solace in her art, meticulously–and at great risk–documenting events by drawing, hoping these messages will make their way to her father’s prison camp to let him know they are still alive. It is a long and harrowing journey, spanning years and covering 6,500 miles, but it is through incredible strength, love, and hope that Lina ultimately survives.”

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I don’t even know where to start with this book… It was interesting to read about this part of the war, because I had no prior knowledge about this. The characters were very, very well written, so was the story itself. This book made me cry so much, and so many times. I literally cried within the first fifty pages. Not necessarily just because of what was happening but also because it made me think. What if that had happened to me and my family, and other loved ones?

I also gave this 5/5 stars!

3. Sarah’s Key by Tatiana de Rosney

“Paris, July 1942: Sarah, a ten year-old girl, is brutally arrested with her family by the French police in the Vel’ d’Hiv’ roundup, but not before she locks her younger brother in a cupboard in the family’s apartment, thinking that she will be back within a few hours.

Paris, May 2002: On Vel’ d’Hiv’s 60th anniversary, journalist Julia Jarmond is asked to write an article about this black day in France’s past. Through her contemporary investigation, she stumbles onto a trail of long-hidden family secrets that connect her to Sarah. Julia finds herself compelled to retrace the girl’s ordeal, from that terrible term in the Vel d’Hiv’, to the camps, and beyond. As she probes into Sarah’s past, she begins to question her own place in France, and to reevaluate her marriage and her life.”

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My aunt recommended this book to me sometime before Christmas (2016, obviously) and  I immidetly asked for it for Christmas, and I got it. I started reading this just after that, but I wasn’t in the right mood so I only read about thirty pages. Then, when the world war two mood came (sounds weird) I decided to give it another go, and god, it was a very good decision.

I loved seeing how the different families in different times eventually connected together in the story. It was heartbreaking and I was always on the edge of my seat, wondering what was going to happen next!

No surprise: 5/5 stars!

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Have you read any of these books? What did you think?

Please let me know if you have any suggestions for books, spesifically world war 2 fiction!

3 world war two books you should read

Hi!

NB! No spoilers!

One of my favourite genres to read in is historical fiction, and the last few years I have found world war 2 as a theme very interesting.

As heartbreaking and disgusting it is to read about these things – even though they are fictional – they are also fascinating because they are inspired by true events…

Therefore, I wanted to share three books about that. All though the last one isn’t actually set in world war two, but it does have a connection.

1. Between Shades of Gray by Ruta Sepetys

“Lina is just like any other fifteen-year-old Lithuanian girl in 1941. She paints, she draws, she gets crushes on boys. Until one night when Soviet officers barge into her home, tearing her family from the comfortable life they’ve known. Separated from her father, forced onto a crowded and dirty train car, Lina, her mother, and her young brother slowly make their way north, crossing the Arctic Circle, to a work camp in the coldest reaches of Siberia. Here they are forced, under Stalin’s orders, to dig for beets and fight for their lives under the cruelest of conditions.

Lina finds solace in her art, meticulously–and at great risk–documenting events by drawing, hoping these messages will make their way to her father’s prison camp to let him know they are still alive. It is a long and harrowing journey, spanning years and covering 6,500 miles, but it is through incredible strength, love, and hope that Lina ultimately survives.”

This, as the other two on this list, is on my top 10 favourite books of all time. (Series like Harry Potter is counted as one!) I read this sometime last year and I still think about it! Between Shades of Gray was so interesting to read because the story was set somewhere I hadn’t, and still haven’t, read much about. The writing was wonderful, and I feel like the characters were amazingly written. I also liked how there were flashbacks so you could see the contrast between her new and old life.

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2. The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah

“Despite their differences, sisters Vianne and Isabelle have always been close. Younger, bolder Isabelle lives in Paris while Vianne is content with life in the French countryside with her husband Antoine and their daughter. But when the Second World War strikes, Antoine is sent off to fight and Vianne finds herself isolated so Isabelle is sent by their father to help her. 

As the war progresses, the sisters’ relationship and strength are tested. With life changing in unbelievably horrific ways, Vianne and Isabelle will find themselves facing frightening situations and responding in ways they never thought possible as bravery and resistance take different forms in each of their actions.”

I read this one in the beginning of March this year. I wasn’t really sure what to except but I figured I would give it a try. And I was not disappointed. Same as the first book, I thought the writing and the progress of the story and the characters were amazing. It just makes me think about how well I have it. I have no idea how I would have handled a war, and I have NO wish to find out either.

Amazing book!

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3. Wolf By Wolf by Ryan Graudin

“The year is 1956, and the Axis powers of the Third Reich and Imperial Japan rule. To commemorate their Great Victory, Hitler and Emperor Hirohito host the Axis Tour: an annual motorcycle race across their conjoined continents. The victor is awarded an audience with the highly reclusive Adolf Hitler at the Victor’s Ball in Tokyo.

Yael, a former death camp prisoner, has witnessed too much suffering, and the five wolves tattooed on her arm are a constant reminder of the loved ones she lost. The resistance has given Yael one goal: Win the race and kill Hitler. A survivor of painful human experimentation, Yael has the power to skinshift and must complete her mission by impersonating last year’s only female racer, Adele Wolfe. This deception becomes more difficult when Felix, Adele twin’s brother, and Luka, her former love interest, enter the race and watch Yael’s every move.

But as Yael grows closer to the other competitors, can she bring herself to be as ruthless as she needs to be to avoid discovery and complete her mission?”

As I wrote in the beginning of the post; one of the books aren’t actually set during the second world war, BUT I decided to add it onto this list because I think it deserves a spot.

When I first started reading this I wasn’t really loving it, but I forced myself to continue and I am so happy I did. The story was so interesting and fun. And it made me very happy about how the war ended…! Anyway, the characters were interesting to figure out and I liked the writing.

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Have you read any of these books? What did you think? And do you have any other world war two books you think I should read?

I am planning on reading The Bookthief and All The Light We Cannot See!

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If you for some reason want to pin this post, then go ahead and pin the picture beneath :))

 

Edit: this list could be updated. I just read a new world war two book. And this would have a different book than Wolf By Wolf if it was written today. 

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September Wrap Up

I have a new video!

I filmed it in the living room this time and used my tripod, which I liked a lot more. One thing I didn’t like was the audio. Sometimes it looks like the audio isn’t perfect with the video… Well well, I guess it’s fine!

Hop you enjoyed! It would mean a lot if you  would take time to watch it, and please subscribe! :)

Sunday Walk

Hello! I wanted to share some of the pictures I took on the same walk as the one I filmed my last video. (If you want to watch it, click here.) As I wrote in the post I shared the video, it was a little muddy, but honestly, I didn’t mind. It was so beautiful.

My favourite season is autumn, and I love going for walks in the woods now when the leaves stars falling and it becomes a little chilly. It just makes me so happy!

I wanted to share some of the pictures I took. I didn’t bring my camera or anything so I had to use my phone, so it’s not the best quality…

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In the end of the war (WW2) a plane crashed in a forest and around 20 people died here. They were buried in the forest, however, the bodies were eventually removed, but there is still a white fence around where they were buried (don’t have a picture of that unfortunately, but you can see it in the video) and this memorial plate thing!

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We had to walk up a “hill” on our way back. We could walk a round, but we just walked down to the memorial site and then back up the same path. My little cousin was tired so he asked if we could take a break on this bench so I took a picture because I liked how the sun came through the trees hahah!

Thank you for reading! What is your favourite season?

And please let me know if there is any world war two related places you think I should visit!

 

 

Sunday Walk With Family (VIDEO)

Hello, and happy Monday!

Yesterday me and some family went on a little walk to this place in a forest where a plane had crashed during world war 2. I had been there before with my school (long time ago though) but I had never actually seen the plane wreckage because we walked really slow so we had to turn and go back before we arrived at the place where the wreckage was… It was very muddy yesterday, but also very beautiful!

It would make me happy if you could take two minutes to watch this :) And subscribe and like hahah

Bye!

World War Two Memorial

Long time no see!

I don’t remember if I have written a post since I started my summer break, but if not, I am officially on break!! It’s nice and relaxing.

Today I, my mum, my sister, my aunt and my cousin, decided to go and visit a world war two memorial. I have always been interested in world war two, but the last few months I have been in a mood for everything world war two! Last week I bought a book with over 1000 pages about Gestapo. It was on sale!

Anyway, I have been at Trandumskogen before with my school, but that was years ago and I couldn’t really remember everything, so I wanted to go there again. And I wanted to pay my respect for those who were killed there. 194 people were executed in that forest, the majority Norwegians, but some British and some Russian.

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There are 18 graves all together.1234

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I honestly don’t have any clue what the stuff in the picture above is. I tried to search online, and ask friends if they remembered from the schooltrip but I haven’t figured it out. Anyone knows?46

This is what is says:

IN THE COMBAT FOR FREEDOM
DURING THE 1940-1945 WAR
173 NORWEGIANS 15 SOVJET-
SUBJECTS AND 6 BRITONS WERE
HERE IN THE WOODS OF TRAN-
DUM EXECUTED BY THE ENEMY

(Translated by wikipedia! Haha)

Have anyone been here? Any other world war two sights I should visit?

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