my 3 favourite world war 2 books

*No spoilers!

I literally wrote this blog post three weeks ago, but since then I have read another one (that is actually set in world war 2) and I decided that I had to redo it. The last two months I have been in the mood to read anything world war two related, and I have actually read almost three books. Two of them are non-fiction, but they are amazing.

But in this post I will show you my three favourite fictional books set during the war:

1. The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah

“Despite their differences, sisters Vianne and Isabelle have always been close. Younger, bolder Isabelle lives in Paris while Vianne is content with life in the French countryside with her husband Antoine and their daughter. But when the Second World War strikes, Antoine is sent off to fight and Vianne finds herself isolated so Isabelle is sent by their father to help her. 

As the war progresses, the sisters’ relationship and strength are tested. With life changing in unbelievably horrific ways, Vianne and Isabelle will find themselves facing frightening situations and responding in ways they never thought possible as bravery and resistance take different forms in each of their actions.”

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I absolutely love this book. It’s so well written and is heartbreaking. It is character driven but it was amazing. I loved seeing the relationship between the sisters during the hard few years. It was interesting and in the end of the book I felt like my heart was ripped apart.

I gave this a 5/5 stars on goodreads!

2. Between Shades of Gray by Ruta Sepetys

“Lina is just like any other fifteen-year-old Lithuanian girl in 1941. She paints, she draws, she gets crushes on boys. Until one night when Soviet officers barge into her home, tearing her family from the comfortable life they’ve known. Separated from her father, forced onto a crowded and dirty train car, Lina, her mother, and her young brother slowly make their way north, crossing the Arctic Circle, to a work camp in the coldest reaches of Siberia. Here they are forced, under Stalin’s orders, to dig for beets and fight for their lives under the cruelest of conditions.

Lina finds solace in her art, meticulously–and at great risk–documenting events by drawing, hoping these messages will make their way to her father’s prison camp to let him know they are still alive. It is a long and harrowing journey, spanning years and covering 6,500 miles, but it is through incredible strength, love, and hope that Lina ultimately survives.”

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I don’t even know where to start with this book… It was interesting to read about this part of the war, because I had no prior knowledge about this. The characters were very, very well written, so was the story itself. This book made me cry so much, and so many times. I literally cried within the first fifty pages. Not necessarily just because of what was happening but also because it made me think. What if that had happened to me and my family, and other loved ones?

I also gave this 5/5 stars!

3. Sarah’s Key by Tatiana de Rosney

“Paris, July 1942: Sarah, a ten year-old girl, is brutally arrested with her family by the French police in the Vel’ d’Hiv’ roundup, but not before she locks her younger brother in a cupboard in the family’s apartment, thinking that she will be back within a few hours.

Paris, May 2002: On Vel’ d’Hiv’s 60th anniversary, journalist Julia Jarmond is asked to write an article about this black day in France’s past. Through her contemporary investigation, she stumbles onto a trail of long-hidden family secrets that connect her to Sarah. Julia finds herself compelled to retrace the girl’s ordeal, from that terrible term in the Vel d’Hiv’, to the camps, and beyond. As she probes into Sarah’s past, she begins to question her own place in France, and to reevaluate her marriage and her life.”

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My aunt recommended this book to me sometime before Christmas (2016, obviously) and  I immidetly asked for it for Christmas, and I got it. I started reading this just after that, but I wasn’t in the right mood so I only read about thirty pages. Then, when the world war two mood came (sounds weird) I decided to give it another go, and god, it was a very good decision.

I loved seeing how the different families in different times eventually connected together in the story. It was heartbreaking and I was always on the edge of my seat, wondering what was going to happen next!

No surprise: 5/5 stars!

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Have you read any of these books? What did you think?

Please let me know if you have any suggestions for books, spesifically world war 2 fiction!

Between Shades of Gray : Review

SPOILER FREE

Happy Saturday!

I was filming a book video for youtube about my favourite books read so far this year (will be uploaded tomorrow) and decided I wanted to share my opinion about one of the books because it´s one of my favourite books ever.

The book is – as you probably know by reading the title – Between Shades of Gray by Ruta Sepetys. It was first published in 2011 so I´m a little late to the game, but I have been seeing it on booktube a few times over the years I have been watching booktube and every time I saw it I got a little bit more interested in it so I finally decided I wanted to buy it, and I did.

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If you have read some of my other blog posts you might know I am very interested in world war two, and this book is set in that period, but it focuses on a different part of the war that I haven´t heard much about so I was excited about reading about something I didn´t know much about. I have never read a lot about what happened in Lithuania and places around there, so it was defiantly a new experience for me.

Lina is just like any other fifteen-year-old Lithuanian girl in 1941. She paints, she draws, she gets crushes on boys. Until one night when Soviet officers barge into her home, tearing her family from the comfortable life they’ve known. Separated from her father, forced onto a crowded and dirty train car, Lina, her mother, and her young brother slowly make their way north, crossing the Arctic Circle, to a work camp in the coldest reaches of Siberia. Here they are forced, under Stalin’s orders, to dig for beets and fight for their lives under the cruelest of conditions.

Lina finds solace in her art, meticulously–and at great risk–documenting events by drawing, hoping these messages will make their way to her father’s prison camp to let him know they are still alive. It is a long and harrowing journey, spanning years and covering 6,500 miles, but it is through incredible strength, love, and hope that Lina ultimately survives.

– Goodreads

I gave this book five stars out of five stars on goodreads; I loved the writing, the point of view and the story it self was wonderful and heartbreaking.

I became so envolved in the characters and story, all I wanted to do was to save them. I obviously knew that couldn´t happen; they are  just characters, and if they had once existed, they would maybe not be alive today!

Even though the characters in the book aren´t real, they, and the story, are based on reality, and I think that hit me. Even though Lina and her family aren´t real, someone else went through something similar, and it just breaks my heart.

I think another reason for this hitting me like it did was that I imagined this happening to me and my family and friends, and it just made me so grateful for the time and place I live in!

Skjermbilde 2016-08-20 kl. 23.46.00This book stayed with me for weeks. After I finished it I was in a book hangover and couldn´t read anything else for a week or so. I cried while reading this book. I cried in the beginning when nothing too dramatic had happened, and I cried in the end.

I´m pretty sure this book will stay with me for a long time.

Thank you for reading, as always!

Have you read this book? What did you think about it?

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